Playing with Microsoft Teams Live Events

Intro

This is a very quick and crude look at using Microsoft Teams Live Events which has just been released into public preview. You can learn more from the official Microsoft documentation here.

Schedule a Live Event

Live Events are created in the same way that you create a standard meeting within Microsoft Teams. When you open the meeting composer, user the dropdown menu at the top left to choose a “New live event”:

Create the event and invite participants who fill the “Producer” or “Presenter” roles within the meeting:

Configure the Live Event by choosing the permissions and production type:

 

Here we have a scheduled Live Event:

The invited “Event Group” will receive an Outlook invite, which also includes an option to dial in via the PSTN:

It doesn’t look as though you can invite external participants directly from Microsoft Teams, but the above-mentioned invite that is created in Outlook could be used. I didn’t spend much time on this so unsure what Microsoft’s intentions are. Once I figure that out I will try and remember to update this comment 🙂

The Live Event will also create a group conversation with the “Event Group” participants you added. This could be useful to discuss things prior to the event:

 

Join a Live Event

Here we are about to join the meeting. Much like a standard meeting, we can configure audio/video and devices. You can also select to join as an attendee rather than your assigned Event Group role of “Presenter” or “Producer”:

Once you have joined, in my case as a producer, you can setup the content that you want to share (left-hand side – pre-live), then make it live (right-hand side):

If you enabled Q&A, you can access this from the top right. Here you can view and answer questions coming in from the participants, or make announcements:

 

When you Join as a participant via the web you have the option to sign-in or join anonymously. In the following example I am going to be joining anonymously:

Here’s the anonymous participant’s web experience. They see the content on the left, and have the ability to participate in the Q&A on the right:

 

Ending a Live Event

Once the meeting is ended it cannot be started again so be careful with that 🙂

 

External Encoder

For the professionals out there, external encoder support is coming soon (later in August). This will allow you to input external sources into the Live Event.

“External encoders allow users to produce their live events directly from an external hardware or software-based encoder with Microsoft Stream. This option is best if you already have studio quality equipment (e.g. media mixers) which support streaming to an RTMP service. This option is typically used in large scale events such as executive town halls – where a single stream from a media mixer is broadcast to the audience.”

 

Performance

Its early days and this is a preview, but I did notice my PC was under huge load when running the Live Event. My PC is fairly powerful so there might be some work required there:

 

Summary

A pretty cool experience for running semi-professional and professional live events. While it’s early days, it looks like they are really building on SfB Broadcast Meetings, and making the user experience much nicer. External encoder support will be a biggy for the pro’s out there. Have a play and let me know what you think.

 

Andrew Morpethhttps://ucgeek.co/author/amorpeth/
Andrew is a Modern Workplace Consultant specialising in Microsoft technologies based in Auckland, New Zealand; Andrew is a Director and Professional Services Manager at Lucidity Cloud Services and a Microsoft MVP.

Related Articles

Azure Virtual Desktop vs Windows 365

Azure Virtual Desktop and Windows 365 are both cloud-based virtual desktop technologies provided by Microsoft. In this article we'll look at some of the key Azure Virtual Desktop vs Windows 365 differences.

Phishing Awareness Training for Office 365

Phishing Awareness Training for Office 365 is available in Microsoft Defender. It can test your user's awareness of this common scamming technique and provide learning tools to help them upskill.

Azure Virtual Desktop & Windows 365 Licencing Requirements

This article details the Microsoft Azure Virtual Desktop and Windows 365 licencing requirements.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Andrew Morpethhttps://ucgeek.co/author/amorpeth/
Andrew is a Modern Workplace Consultant specialising in Microsoft technologies based in Auckland, New Zealand; Andrew is a Director and Professional Services Manager at Lucidity Cloud Services and a Microsoft MVP.

Latest Articles

Azure Virtual Desktop vs Windows 365

Azure Virtual Desktop and Windows 365 are both cloud-based virtual desktop technologies provided by Microsoft. In this article we'll look at some of the key Azure Virtual Desktop vs Windows 365 differences.

Phishing Awareness Training for Office 365

Phishing Awareness Training for Office 365 is available in Microsoft Defender. It can test your user's awareness of this common scamming technique and provide learning tools to help them upskill.

Azure Virtual Desktop & Windows 365 Licencing Requirements

This article details the Microsoft Azure Virtual Desktop and Windows 365 licencing requirements.

Azure Virtual Desktop Review

This Azure Virtual Desktop review reveals a virtual desktop solution ready for the modern workplace. It's modern, fast, and scalable.

Azure Virtual Desktop Classic vs ARM

This article takes you through some of the differences between Azure Virtual Desktop Classic vs ARM, Microsoft's upgrade to AVD.