Understanding the Lync Response Group Abandoned Calls Report

The statistics provided in the Response Group Usage Report are a little misleading without understanding the definitions. An abandoned call doesn’t necessarily mean the caller has hung up in frustration or been disconnected, only that the call was not answered by an agent. This can happen because a queue timeout/ overflow or workflow transfer has occurred, which transfers the call outside of the Repose Group Service. For example the call maybe transferred to an Exchange IVR, a users voice mail, or an outside number. The transferred call may still in fact be answered further down the chain, however the Response Group Service has no visibility to report on this.

  • Received calls – Total number of calls received by all instances of the Response Group application.
  • Successful calls – Total number of calls that were picked up by the Response Group application.
  • Offered calls -Total number of calls that were transferred to a Response Group agent.
  • Answered calls – Total number of calls that were actually answered by a Response Group agent.
  • Percentage of abandoned calls – Percentage of calls that were received by the Response Group application but were never answered by an agent. This value is calculated by subtracting the Answered calls from the Received calls, and then dividing that value by the number of Received calls. For example, if you received 10 calls and 7 were answered, you would subtract 7 from 10, leaving 3 unanswered calls. That value would then be divided by 10, giving you an abandoned call percentage of 30%.
  • Transferred calls – Total number of Response Group calls that were transferred because of a queue timeout or queue overflow.
Andrew Morpethhttps://ucgeek.co/author/amorpeth/
Andrew is a Modern Workplace Consultant specialising in Microsoft technologies based in Auckland, New Zealand; Andrew is a Director and Professional Services Manager at Lucidity Cloud Services and a Microsoft MVP.

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Andrew Morpethhttps://ucgeek.co/author/amorpeth/
Andrew is a Modern Workplace Consultant specialising in Microsoft technologies based in Auckland, New Zealand; Andrew is a Director and Professional Services Manager at Lucidity Cloud Services and a Microsoft MVP.

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